Share

CSO Statistics

Women and Men in Ireland 2010

Life expectancy for women was 81.6 years in Ireland in 2006, compared with 76.8 years for men. Women's annual income was around 70% of that earned by men in 2008, though after adjusting for time worked, women's hourly earnings were around 90% of men's. These facts are contained in the report Women and Men in Ireland 2010 published by the CSO (February 2011). Men have a higher rate of employment, but also a higher rate of unemployment.

Employment: The employment rate for men in Ireland stood at about 75% over recent years, but in 2009 it plummeted to 67.3% and dropped again in 2010 to 64.5%. The EU target rate for women in employment is 60% by 2010, a target that was met by Ireland in 2007 and 2008, but not in 2009 or 2010, when the rate had fallen to 56.4%. In 2010 46% of those in employment were women. Men worked an average of 39.4 hours a week in 2010 compared with 30.9 for women.

Unemployment: The unemployment rate for men in Ireland was about 5% in recent years but in 2009 it increased sharply to 15.1% and rose again in 2010 to 16.7%. The unemployment rate for women, which stood at about 4% over the last few years, also increased in 2009 to 8.1% and rose again in 2010 to 9.8%. For the 20-24 age group, 32.9% of men and 18.7% of women were unemployed in 2010. Press release here.

Women and Men in Ireland - 2009 CSO Report

Males are more likely to leave school early and females are more likely to have a third-level qualification. Women live longer than men, work fewer hours, earn less and are under-represented in local and regional authorities and in the Oireachtas according to the report Women and Men in Ireland 2009 published by the CSO today. The employment rate for men in Ireland stood at about 75% over the years, but in 2009 it fell sharply to 67.3%. The employment rate for women also fell in 2009, but to a far lesser extent. The EU target rate for women in employment is 60% by 2010, a target that was met by Ireland in 2007 and 2008, but not in 2009 when the employment rate for women fell to 57.8%. The unemployment rate for men in Ireland was about 5% in recent years but in 2009 it increased sharply to 15.1%. The unemployment rate for women, which stood at about 4% over the last few years, also increased in 2009 to stand at 8.1%. These large increases were reflected in all age groups, and in particular for those aged 15 to 19, with an unemployment rate of 40% for men aged 15 to 19 in 2009 and 32.3% for women. The report provides much cause for reflection and 200 delegates to the Congress Womens' Conference - Building Equality into Recovery, 5,6th March in Belfast - will discuss the report in detail.

2008 Report

The CSO report on Women and Men in Ireland for 2008 - Among the headlines are:

Ireland had the most gender balanced population in the EU in 2007, with 100 women per 100 men in the population. For older age groups the proportion of women in the population was higher with 80 men per 100 women in the 65 and over age group. At EU level there were 71 men per 100 women in the 65 and over age group.

    
  • The employment rate for women in Ireland was 60.5% in the second quarter of 2008 compared with 48.1% in 1998.
  • 
  • Women's income in 2006 was around two-thirds of men's income. After adjusting for differences in hours worked, women's hourly earnings were around 86% of men's.
  • 
  • The report shows that women are under-represented in decision-making structures at both national and regional levels. In 2008 only 13% of TDs in Dáil Eireann were women, while they accounted for 34% of members of State Boards, 17% of members of local authorities and just 15% of members of regional authorities. The average representation in national parliaments for EU27 countries was nearly 24% in 2008.
  • 
  • The education and health sectors employed the highest proportion of women, with an 80% share of the total at work in health, 85% in primary education and nearly two-thirds in second level education (62%). However, women were not well represented at senior level positions. In the health service, women represented only 32% of medical and dental consultants. Similarly, women accounted for 51% of primary school managers, and in second level schools women accounted for only 38% of school managers.
  • 
  • The early school leavers rate among women aged 18-24 in 2007 was 8.7%, which was much lower than the male rate of 14.2%.
  • 
  • The proportion of men at risk of poverty in 2006, after pensions and social transfers, was 17% compared to 19% of women.